Utah Shakespeare Festival

April 9th, 2011

Travel

Every year, from June to October, the productions of Shakespeare and other dramatists are relived at the Utah Shakespeare Festival. The festival is held on the campus of Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah. The event makes Cedar City a destination for locals, out-of-state travelers, and even international Shakespeare gurus. Each performance is meticulously planned, practiced, and executed. The southwest desert location of the festival creates a stunning backdrop for the phenomenal performances, especially those in the famous outdoor theatre. If you come to experience the works of the Bard, we recommend that you stay for several performances. While you are here, consider adding a few sightseeing activities to your itinerary.

Cedar City is an ideal base location for exploring nearby Zion National Park. This park is Utah’s most popular, drawing in nearly 3 million visitors a year. Zion is a collection of canyon walls, rift valleys, towering sandstone spires, and fantastic geological anomalies. The park has been a hot spot of tourist activity since the completion of Interstate 15, which connects Cedar City to the rest of Utah.

There are activities in Zion National Park for every type of outdoor enthusiast or nature lover. You can hike deep into the surrounding country, conquer cliff faces with professional climbers, or simply breathe in the beauty of the setting sun, as it splashes color onto the rock formations.

Although slightly farther away, Bryce Canyon National Park is another excellent spot for a day-trip. Bryce Canyon is not a canyon at all, but a natural amphitheatre that is filled with thousands upon thousands of freestanding rock columns. These columns are known as hoodoos, and have been created by the erosive power of the desert winds. At dusk the entire amphitheatre takes on an otherworld appearance, as the hoodoo forms seem almost human. It is an experience that should not be missed!

For any visitor that has come to enjoy the plays, we invite you to couple your experience with the drama of nature. Because, as the Bard said, “…all the world’s a stage.”

Share Button